should we deserve a feedback after an interview?

English: A business ideally is continually see...
English: A business ideally is continually seeking feedback from customers: are the products helpful? are their needs being met? Constructive criticism helps marketers adjust offerings to meet customer needs. Source of diagram: here (see public domain declaration at top). Questions: write me at my Wikipedia talk page (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are a lot of things that I do not like today, probably because as a “new position seeking” person I’m more vulnerable or may be because of my situation I have to relate in a different way with different people.

One of the thing that hurt me more when seeking for a job is the feedback, or, to say the truth, the absolutely lack of feedback coming form your counterpart.  I understand that hiring someone is a process that require selection and that is focused on needs that are not always visible to the candidate, but anyway in a correct and ethic worlds an answer should be given to anyone, in good or bad.

And I do not mean a complete or detailed one, sometimes would be enough to say “we are looking for a different candidate” would be enough, but let people waiting for an answer that will never come is quite a nasty habit.

It happen to me all the time, first, second, third interview and then we we’ll call you in a week or two…and then the silence. funny first they’re all kind and nice, they talk ask for email and connection, and then they disappear. Come on guys I know you’re busy and I know we are not friends, but as you ask me to be polite and kind with you isn’t something you should give me back? education and respect claims that if you state you will give me a feedback you should give it to me, and forcing people to call for a deserved feedback is never a appreciable thing.

And if there are budget concerns, just tell me. it is not such a bad thing to say, we’re looking for someone cheaper. Another thing I never understood is why CV are not always screened in term of seniority, if you’re looking for a junior position you should not call someone in the field since 20 years. and if you’re looking for seniority could you expect a economical request not aligned?

OK today I’m in a really bad mood, I admit it, but I think that between peers a little more fair feedbacks should be a minimum baseline.

 

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Antonio Ieranò
CSO, Cyber Security Architect, technical evangelist, consultant, writer, journalist and trainer
I am a Security Manager and architect, CSO, BDM, marketing specialist, and tech evangelist with over 20 years of experience serving as a community liaison, subject matter expert, and high-profile trainer for key technologies and solutions. My experience includes acting as the public face of Huawei technology and before Cisco security technologies; leading pan-European technical teams in development of new Cisco security products; and serving as a key public speaker and trainer on behalf of new high-tech products. My expertise spans IT development and implementation, marketing strategy, legal issues, and budget / financial management.

Specialties and Executive Expertise
IT Strategy, Technical Audits, Enterprise Architecture & Applications, Technical Sales Liaison, Solution Architecture, Network Design, Architecture, & Security, Vulnerability Assessment & Management, Systems Engineering, Data Privacy, Cloud Computing, Marketing Strategy, Budget Management, Social Media Marketing, High-Impact Presentations,incident handling, Forensics, Italian companies, Authentication, Infrastructure security, Security manager, Security issues, Attacks, Security infrastructure, Data encryption

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CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 should we deserve a feedback after an interview? by The Puchi Herald Magazine is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.